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Video of a surfer in close encounter with a Great White Shark was uploaded to Facebook on June-23-2015. The shark had been circling the surfer for a couple of minutes before he decided to record it with his gopro camera. The shark is very cautious as it circles the man perhaps just curious, perhaps more. As you can see in the video the surfer tries to make his way around the shark back to more shallow water before it disappears. The best thing he did was to remain calm while he was watching the sharks movements in case it would attack him.




The video takes place in Manly beach in Sydney Australia. Manly beach and North Steyne. Sydney’s northern beaches is a common place for shark sightings. Last fatal shark attack was in February-4-1936 when David Paton was swimming around South Steyne. His body was never recovered. Several beaches along the NSW north coast and Sydney coast have been closed earlier this year after several shark sightings, and one surfer was killed by a great white shark on shelly beach near Ballina in february this year.
The video was shot only a week after two teens lost their limbs in two separate shark attacks at North Carolina beach.

Sharks attack only rarely, but when they do, severe and sometimes fatal injuries commonly result. Scientists don't believe sharks attack humans to eat us; rather, they bite into our flesh because they're curious to find out what kind of animal we are - kind of like how dogs like to sniff new friends, only a lot more deadly. Staying out of shark habitats is the surest way to avoid getting hurt, but if you've accidentally wandered into shark-infested waters, you've got to have a plan in place.

Don't take your eyes off the shark. Sharks have several different attack methods. Sometimes they swim right up and have at it, sometimes they circle for awhile before lunging, and sometimes they sneak up from behind for a surprise attack. To be able to defend against the shark, you must know where it is, so make every effort to watch the animal, even as you're working out your escape. Stay calm and don't make sudden movements. When you first spot the shark, chances are it will swim away without bothering you. You cannot out-swim a shark, so trying to sprint to safety may not be your best option, unless you're already very close to shore. It's important to keep your wits about you so you can continuously appraise the situation and figure out how to get to safety.
Move slowly toward the shore or a boat; choose whichever is closest. Don't thrash your arms or kick or splash while you swim.

Do not block the shark's path. If you're standing between the shark and the open ocean, move away
Don't turn your back on the shark as you move. Remember, it's important to keep the shark in view.

 
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