It's definitely been a busy big wave surfing season at Nazaré. The 2015/2016 winter brought giant swells to Portugal's iconic surf break, alongside fresh new faces.

Challenge and fear go hand in hand in the heart of Nazaré's underwater canyon. The famous fishing town is increasingly attracting more and more surfers. The hunt for the 100-foot wave is a continuous dream that, one day, will become a reality.
The cold season is almost over but, until the first rays of spring sunshine anything is possible. Ask Jarryd Foster and Mick Corbett, two surfers from the other side of the world who know well the dangers of their occupation.
They traveled all the way from Australia to experience the toughness of Nazaré's Praia do Norte. And they loved it as much as the panel of judges working for the WSL Big Wave Awards.
Mick Corbett: descending the liquid mountains of Nazaré | Photo: Pedro Miranda
"The currents and the inside section are so different to any other wave I have surfed. The waves get so big, and all join up to create the craziest inside section," Mick Corbett told Red Bull.
"The currents are also very strong and can hold you down for ages while sweeping you towards the rocks and back out to the lineup. It's all so worth it, though."
Mick and Jarryd worked as a team and supported each other out in the lineup. Even when the Nazaré bombs forced a few scary wipeouts. Nature has its rules. But they had the time of their lives.
"Words can not explain this shore break. Every time we fall and loose the board, we have to deal with this horrible shore break. It's always a make or break move, when it's big, to get back out safely with both of us and the board all still intact," Jarryd Foster wrote.
"Nazaré is the boss of all waves; she will always win. Mick and I always pick a number of waves each before we swap. Going to miss you Nazaré, and all the people who made it home for Mel, Mick and myself. See you all in November."
The Nazaré lighthouse and the big waves will continue to echo and assault the duo's minds. Next time, Jarryd Foster and Mick Corbett might very well write a historical new entry in the history of surfing.